Runsketchplay

The sketchlings and work of Dawn Singleton.
ditear.deviantart.com/

jakewyattriot:

I apologize as this comes off as disrespectful to Michael Brown or Trayvon Martin. Or their families. Or YOU, the reader. I’m not about that. That’s not why I drew this.

I am just really freaked out that 40% of Americans (and 47% of White Americans) do not think that the killings and violence in Ferguson ‘raise any racial issues.’ Fellow White Persons, this is our chance to learn. This is our chance to change.

When Trayvon Martin was murdered because Full Grown Men in America are frightened to violence by the presence black children, the dialogue turned very quickly into a conversation about gun control.

And gun control is an issue that deserves our attention.

But it won’t change the massive poverty in Black America. The arrest rate. The education statistics. The institutional, systemic, casual, or passive racism that plagues our country.

And it wouldn’t have saved Michael Brown.

Anyway. I’m sorry if this comes off as disrespectful or insincere or preachy. I’m sorry if my execution (or personality) gets in the way of what I’m trying to say. I am an imperfect artist, an imperfect person, and I am, undoubtedly, blinded to a million things by my own glaring whiteness. So this might be… Lord, this might be awful. I’m so sorry if it’s awful. Really.

But. I just keep thinking… Look, my wife is pregnant with our first child. A boy. We’re nervous, we’re excited, we’re SO ANXIOUS because what the hell do you do with babies? WE don’t know. But if we were a black family… in this country… we would be so terrified. Because we live in a nation that murders the children of black parents, puts it on the news WITH RIOTS AND TEAR GAS as decoration, and still half of us don’t even see it as a problem. Can you imagine that? Can you imagine bringing a child into that reality, to face the odds we lay out for black kids?

That would break me. I’ve never known anything like that. No one should ever know anything like that.

So let’s talk to our friends about race. Lets talk to our families. And when actual victims of racism try to tell us what’s going on in, say, a peaceful community protest as they are being gassed and shot at by cops WE SHOULD LISTEN TO AND BELIEVE THEM. Let’s talk to each other about this until we are all on the same page.

And then let’s turn the damn page.

(via leseanthomas)

blackyjunkgallery:

i just want to say thank you all for the feedbacks about the kickstarter about the chaud nem jump (and maybe for my own project). It give a lot of idea and motivation.

(via ktshy)

sakimichan:

siemprereblog:

artist is sakimichan.
i happened to see this on my feed and of course, wanted to know who drew it so i clicked on the comments.
take a look.
the page doesn’t even give credit because “No page does”. this person has the time to repost images, but can’t even give credit to the artists that took the time to draw amazing pieces like this?
really?
people like these piss me off. people should always be credited for the work they’ve done. :T

I messaged that page, and asked to source me, but that guy didn’t want to, so I told him/her I was going to report this to facebook, He called my ignorant, Then I told this guy to Take my image off if he’s so unwilling to link back.

So Long story short, He/she didnt want to link  back to the original artist (there were alot, he/she didnt want to take off the images when I requested him to take them off. He was even using my image as his icon.

and he/she told me to fuck off illiterately ,

In the end this kind of people aren’t worth dealing with so I’m not going to pursue this guy further, I’m just going to keep doing what I love and that’s it.

ctchrysler:

Back in the day, me and my buddy randomly grabbed a bunch of samples and created this dopeness.

struggling with an injury - story and advice!

loish:

Hey everyone! In some previous blog posts, I mentioned that I’m struggling with an injury to my drawing arm. Although I hoped that the problem would have totally gone away after more than a month of rest, it actually hasn’t, and I’m still struggling with it at this very moment. It’s actually been harder emotionally than it has physically. I’ve decided to go ahead and write a blog entry about it, not only to keep my followers in the loop but also as a cautionary tale to any artists out there who have not yet sustained an injury. If I had been more aware of the risks, maybe this would never have happened to me, so the very least I can do is try to help those who aren’t aware of the risks.

Read More

qinni:

image

Drawing things out makes me feel a little better

Sorry for the long rant ^^;

Some people don’t feel artists deserve compensation seeing as it’s not as “essential” as, say, doctors or plumbers….Of course, then there are those who think that artists don’t even deserve recognition, let alone payment, so they take away artist sources and comments, thinking that artists live off of the euphoria of drawing alone (and of course if we complain about it, we’re being selfish bitches or spoiled brats). 

Yes, recognition is amazing, but we also don’t want to work for free (unless it’s something you just REALLY want to do of course and isn’t looking to buy food with recognition coupons). There are plenty of great companies and people who hire artists, and these hired paid artists get plenty of recognition.

Also, Stephen Silver’s video on this is pretty great so take a look if you haven’t yet.

Please note: I don’t mean to say you shouldn’t ever draw for anyone for free evar ever, but you deserve to be paid. Your art has value, and more importantly, your artistic skills have value and people should not expect it for free. 

This also is pretty good/funny: Should I work for free? a flow cart

(via qinni)

juliedillon:

eskiworks:

The Workaholic Pedestal
We freelancers have a tendency to never truly be away from our work, regardless of the time or day of the week.  Especially if like me, your work station is in your home.  We work long hours and dedicate ourselves fully to whatever project we have at hand.  We loose sleep, skip social gatherings, eat whatever is quick and easy so we can get back to work. I have noticed that there is a sense of pride in general among freelancers that we are so in love with our work that we can dedicate ourselves this way.  Passion for your chosen profession is definitely a plus!
However, I have also observed a downside to this part of freelancing.  That dedication can cross the line into an unhealthy workaholic lifestyle, and other freelancers actually encourage it.  There is an underlying unspoken rule in freelancer culture that if you’re not working, you’re slacking.  I’ve seen other freelancers take subtle stabs at their peers for taking time off to see family, to tend to daily life, or to just have a day (or three) to simply BREATHE and do something other than art. Doing things like comparing your work load with others’ work load, making yourself out to be the harder working one.  Referring to things like showering, cooking, and cleaning as “free time” or “vacation”.  It creates or adds to guilt surrounding work, which is really not a nice thing to do to your friends and peers. 
The disclaimer here is that clearly not every freelancer does this, and I think those that do are not being purposefully malicious, so please don’t misread this as an attack.  I’m guilty of playing into this myself, we are just falling into a part of the starving artist stereotype;  The idea that your chosen craft/art must encompass ALL of your being, every day and every moment for you to truly be passionate about it. 
The truth is, there IS life outside of art and work, and it’s not a contest. We are living beings that must eat and sleep, and we are social animals that must have a connection with others.  So not only do we HAVE to do things other than art, but it’s also ok to spend time doing other things that make you happy.  It doesn’t mean you are less passionate about your work, or that other artists who spend more time on theirs love it more.
And yes, there are deadlines we must work under.  But none of us want to be starving artists. None of us enjoy loosing sleep, eating crappy or skipping meals, working our fingers to the bone, letting friendships fall apart…  These are not good things.  You aren’t a cooler or more a passionate artist for making those sacrifices.  So I think instead of putting that lifestyle on a pedestal, we should be encouraging one another to take time to care for ourselves, and to have a life outside of their work. Just like anyone else doing any other kind of work.  =)

YES. Thank you. It makes me really uncomfortable when I hear professionals saying things like “if you are not drawing 24/7 you’ll never make it”, implying that having outside interests or taking care of yourself means you will fail. You undoubtedly need to be dedicated and focused to succeed as a freelancer, but what is the point of having the so-called freedom that freelancing is supposed to provide you if you can’t even leave your desk every once in a while? Exercise, get outside, socialize, have other hobbies. I’ve found I’m more productive and happier and healthier and more passionate about my work and my career when I take time off, every day, to get away from work for a little while. Building a career is important and rewarding, but your life is not comprised solely of the amount of work you are able do. Your life is not defined solely by how many hours you clock at your work desk. 

juliedillon:

eskiworks:

The Workaholic Pedestal

We freelancers have a tendency to never truly be away from our work, regardless of the time or day of the week.  Especially if like me, your work station is in your home.  We work long hours and dedicate ourselves fully to whatever project we have at hand.  We loose sleep, skip social gatherings, eat whatever is quick and easy so we can get back to work. I have noticed that there is a sense of pride in general among freelancers that we are so in love with our work that we can dedicate ourselves this way.  Passion for your chosen profession is definitely a plus!

However, I have also observed a downside to this part of freelancing.  That dedication can cross the line into an unhealthy workaholic lifestyle, and other freelancers actually encourage it.  There is an underlying unspoken rule in freelancer culture that if you’re not working, you’re slacking.  I’ve seen other freelancers take subtle stabs at their peers for taking time off to see family, to tend to daily life, or to just have a day (or three) to simply BREATHE and do something other than art. Doing things like comparing your work load with others’ work load, making yourself out to be the harder working one.  Referring to things like showering, cooking, and cleaning as “free time” or “vacation”.  It creates or adds to guilt surrounding work, which is really not a nice thing to do to your friends and peers. 

The disclaimer here is that clearly not every freelancer does this, and I think those that do are not being purposefully malicious, so please don’t misread this as an attack.  I’m guilty of playing into this myself, we are just falling into a part of the starving artist stereotype;  The idea that your chosen craft/art must encompass ALL of your being, every day and every moment for you to truly be passionate about it. 

The truth is, there IS life outside of art and work, and it’s not a contest. We are living beings that must eat and sleep, and we are social animals that must have a connection with others.  So not only do we HAVE to do things other than art, but it’s also ok to spend time doing other things that make you happy.  It doesn’t mean you are less passionate about your work, or that other artists who spend more time on theirs love it more.

And yes, there are deadlines we must work under.  But none of us want to be starving artists. None of us enjoy loosing sleep, eating crappy or skipping meals, working our fingers to the bone, letting friendships fall apart…  These are not good things.  You aren’t a cooler or more a passionate artist for making those sacrifices.  So I think instead of putting that lifestyle on a pedestal, we should be encouraging one another to take time to care for ourselves, and to have a life outside of their work. Just like anyone else doing any other kind of work.  =)

YES. Thank you. It makes me really uncomfortable when I hear professionals saying things like “if you are not drawing 24/7 you’ll never make it”, implying that having outside interests or taking care of yourself means you will fail. You undoubtedly need to be dedicated and focused to succeed as a freelancer, but what is the point of having the so-called freedom that freelancing is supposed to provide you if you can’t even leave your desk every once in a while? Exercise, get outside, socialize, have other hobbies. I’ve found I’m more productive and happier and healthier and more passionate about my work and my career when I take time off, every day, to get away from work for a little while. Building a career is important and rewarding, but your life is not comprised solely of the amount of work you are able do. Your life is not defined solely by how many hours you clock at your work desk.